Top 5 Reads of the Week | February 27, 2019

Factor InvestorWhy Do Markets Go Up?
by Ehren Stanhope | Factor Investor

“Think of the U.S. stock market as one holding company named USA, Inc. that holds a portfolio of businesses. If you were the CEO of this holding company, you would have two jobs. First, ensure profits are generated by the underlying businesses. Second, reinvest those profits in the best interests of the company’s owners.”


Workism is Making Americans MiserableThe Atlantic
by Derek Thompson | The Atlantic

“Or maybe the logic here isn’t economic at all. It’s emotional—even spiritual. The best-educated and highest-earning Americans, who can have whatever they want, have chosen the office for the same reason that devout Christians attend church on Sundays: It’s where they feel most themselves.”

 


Behavioural InvestmentIs an Obsession with Outcomes the
Most Damaging Investor Bias?

by Joe Wiggins | Behavioural Investment

“Our tendency to judge the quality of a decision by the ultimate consequence is a simple concept.  In many instances it is also a prudent one; results often provide a useful gauge of the value of the actions that led to them.  However, as with many things, once you add a healthy dose of randomness things start to become problematic.”


The New York TimesYouTube Unleashed a Conspiracy
Theory Boom. Can It Be Contained?

by Kevin Roose | The New York Times

“The law now shields internet platforms from liability for all user-generated content they host, as well as the algorithmic recommendations they make. A revised law could cover only the content and leave platforms on the hook for their recommendations.”


MIT Tech Review

China’s CRISPR twins might have
had their brains inadvertently enhanced

by Antonio Regalado | MIT Technology Review

“According to their new report, appearing in the journal Cell, people who naturally lack CCR5 recover more quickly from strokes. What’s more, people missing at least one copy of the gene seem to go further in school, suggesting a possible role in everyday intelligence.”