• Top 5 Reads of the Week | 361 Capital Blog  

    Our favorite reads of the week and the quotes that make them worthy…

    “The methodical nature of bull markets is one of the biggest reasons we see overreactions during the inevitable bear market to follow. Markets that slowly go up blind investors to the fact that sometimes they also go down. And those overreactions are amplified by the fact that no one knows how long the music will continue to play.

  • Top 5 Reads of the Week | 361 Capital Blog  

    Our favorite reads of the week and the quotes that make them worthy…

    “The old model of power plants that feed electrical lines on one-way trips to people’s homes is crumbling. Power companies increasingly need AI and software to predict when and where power will be available—and automation to make sure power gets to where it’s needed, when it’s needed, without overloading the system.

  • Must Reads of the Week | 361 Capital Blog  

    Our favorite reads of the week and the quotes that make them worthy…

    The story behind these events is far from an indictment of indexing. It’s a reminder, first, of how diversification protects against unexpected market moves. It also offers a warning of how important it is for index-fund investors to understand what they own.

  • Top 5 Reads of the Week | 361 Capital Blog  

    Our favorite reads of the week and the quotes that make them worthy…

    “While I agree that big tech is eating the stock market, this isn’t something we should be alarmed about. This is just the nature of capital markets. Industries that dominated in one era (i.e. railroads) are supplanted by those in another era (i.e. gasoline/motor vehicles). This happens over and over again and will continue to happen in the future.

  • Top 5 Reads of the Week | 361 Capital Blog  

    Our favorite reads of the week and the quotes that make them worthy…

    Business cycles in the future may resemble those of the 19th century, when monetary policy didn’t exist. From 1854 to 1913, the U.S. had 15 recessions, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research, the academic research group that dates business cycles. Many were severe.